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  • Todays PC Security News

    An FYI for all of you.

    Fake fast food survey with cash reward leads to phishing site. Scammers often use the familiarity of a brand as a means of lessening the victims’ tendency to be cautious when perusing unsolicited e-mails. In this latest e-mail scam, this method is coupled with the offer of $80 to whomever takes a short survey. The e-mail supposedly comes from a globally well-known fast food chain, and claims that the company is planning major changes to the establishments in order to improve the quality of service. In order to do so, they are asking the customers to fill out a survey and they offer the cash as an incentive. Symantec reports that to access the survey, the victims are encouraged to follow the link in the e-mail, which will then take them to a bogus page ostensibly belonging to the company. After the survey is completed, the victims are redirected to a fake user-authentication page where they are asked to enter their name, e-mail address, credit card number, expiration date, verification number and personal identification number, in order to get the money. but the survey is fake, and the page is a phishing page.

    1.5 million stolen Facebook IDs up for sale. A hacker named Kirllos has a rare deal for anyone who wants to spam, steal or scam on Facebook: an unprecedented number of user accounts offered at rock-bottom prices. Researchers at VeriSign’s iDefense group recently spotted Kirllos selling Facebook user names and passwords in an underground hacker forum, but what really caught their attention was the volume of credentials he had for sale: 1.5 million accounts. IDefense does not know if Kirllos’ accounts are legitimate, and Facebook did not respond to messages April 22 seeking comment. If the accounts are legitimate, the hacker has data on about one in every 300 Facebook users. His asking price varies from $25 to $45 per 1,000 accounts, depending on the number of contacts each user has. To date, Kirllos seems to have sold close to 700,000 accounts, according to the VeriSign director of cyber intelligence. Hackers have been selling stolen social-networking credentials for a while - VeriSign has seen a brisk trade in names and passwords for Russia’s VKontakte, for example. But now the trend is to go after global targets such as Facebook, the director said.
    Herd Member #87
    US Navy Veteran

  • #2
    You would think that the FEDS would have better control over this...Felony if caught SCAMMING!
    .
    2010 FLHX - Street Glide
    HERD MEMBER #00003

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TheBoss View Post
      You would think that the FEDS would have better control over this...Felony if caught SCAMMING!
      Well I agree but those guys that do that sort of thing keep me busy in my part time gig.
      Herd Member #87
      US Navy Veteran

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      • #4
        Well the internet is like riding a motorcycle, we all know there is risk involved, but we continue to do it anyway. The only real way to protect yourself is to not use it.
        HERD Member #114
        2007 FLHTCU Ultra Classic
        When all else fails, GET A BIGGER HAMMER!
        If common sense was so common, wouldn't everyone have it?

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        • #5
          Thanks for the heads up!
          Jeff
          09 FLHRCI
          Herd Member #00045

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          • #6
            Originally posted by jirvin View Post
            Thanks for the heads up!
            I get articles everyday on the latest and greatest computer security threats and am more than happy to publish that information if it is desired.
            Herd Member #87
            US Navy Veteran

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